Download "Designing Experiential Learning in Adult Organizations"

HRDQ products are based on the Experiential Learning Model. Your learners won't be in a passive environment where they simply listen to someone describe how something should be done. Instead, they'll be engaged in situations where they discover the value of a skill for themselves and then practice it. 

To learn more about experiential learning, fill out this form to download the "Designing Experiential Learning in Adult Organizations" white paper.

Better Learning. Better Performance. Better Life.

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Experiential is the key word that explains the power of HRDQ products to deliver on our promise of better learning. HRDQ activities don’t place learners in a passive environment where they simply listen to someone describe how something should be done. Instead, we engage learners in situations where they discover the value of a skill for themselves and then practice it. Practice is critical, because, without it nobody can become more skillful – at anything. To master bicycle riding, you must get on a bike; listening to someone describe how to do it isn’t enough. The same applies to the broad range of interpersonal skills covered by HRDQ programs. No matter how much information you absorb about these skills, your first attempts to perform them are likely to be awkward. No practice? No skill.

Experiential learning results in better performance, because it increases the odds that training will transfer from the learning environment to the workplace, where it really counts, where participants can apply what they have learned in a way that improves their job performance. Why? Think about it. If you have learned something about a skill, but you’ve never practiced performing it, would you want to debut your first attempts before an audience of real supervisors, subordinates, coworkers, or customers? Practice during training, in a (hopefully) consequence-free environment, leads to application on the job because it gives learners the self-confidence to use and refine a skill in the real world. They’ve been there. They’ve done it. They know they can do it again.

And better performance leads to professional and personal success, which leads to a better life. We aren’t referring only to higher salaries, promotions, and status, though all of those certainly matter. We mean simply this: Any activity, task, or job is far more rewarding when you can perform it skillfully. Life is better when you do things well.

Thank you for making HRDQ your partner in training.

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The HRDQ Experiential Learning Model

Experiential learning is not a new concept, but the term is often misused. The simple act of having learners partake in an activity is not, in and of itself, experiential learning. Nor is experiential learning solely activity based. Experiential learning, rather, guides participants through a process, with each stage acting as a building block for the next.

A Framework for Learning

At the core of each of our products is the HRDQ Experiential Learning Model – a proven approach to developing skills that’s built upon the research of leading adult-learning theorists, specifically Kolb, Honey, Mumford, and Jones, who conceived the idea of learning as a cycle. The underlying premise of the model is that adults learn best when they perceive a need to know something or are motivated to perform more effectively. As shown above, the HRDQ model serves as a framework for both facilitators and learners, with each stage defining their interconnected roles and responsibilities.

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THE STAGES OF LEARNING

Let’s examine the seven phases of the HRDQ Experiential Learning Model in more detail from the facilitator’s point of view.

Focusing

Engage participants by helping them relate to the concepts that will be presented in the workshop. Direct their focus to the knowledge, skills, or attitudes that they are about to learn.

Experiencing

Introduce an activity that stimulates the learner and relates to the key concepts and skills covered by the program. This provides learners with a concrete experience that elicits initial reactions and honest responses to the topic at hand.

Reflecting

Invite participants to reflect on the activity and discuss their responses. Encourage them to relate it to similar past experiences in an effort to make connections and discover meaning.

Thinking

Present new ideas and perspectives designed to clarify the activity and participants’ reflective observations. Guide learners through the process of thinking critically about this information and analyzing the conclusions drawn from previous stages. They should incorporate their new understanding into their existing knowledge or use logical thinking to create a new theoretical construct.

Modifying

Help learners interpret feedback about their current use of the knowledge, skills, or attitudes addressed in the program. Encourage them to seek alternate outcomes by adapting or modifying their behavior or approach.

Practicing

Provide participants with the opportunity to practice and apply what they’ve learned in a risk-free setting. Help the learner incorporate the desired knowledge, skills, or attitudes into his or her own personal repertoire and consider how to use them in the workplace or other appropriate situations. This process is referred to as active experimentation.

Integrating

Explore how participants can transfer their newfound knowledge, skills, and attitudes into the real world. Prompt them to answer two key questions: “What have I learned?” and “How can I apply this to my real- life roles to improve my performance?” This stage is commonly referred to as action planning.

Conclusion

If the stages of learning are followed in sequence, the desired learning effect will more likely be achieved – that is, participants will internalize what they’ve learned and be able to apply it in the workplace. HRDQ strives to maximize the outcomes of your training initiatives through proper application of experiential learning, the end result of which is “Better Learning. Better Performance. Better Life.”

HRDQ’s product line has always been practical and high quality, and it anticipates trends and meets customer expectations through good research and testing. Products based on HRDQ’s Experiential Learning Model have helped us build a base of steady repeat customers. The choice of modular products to complete training workshops gives the user maximum diversity when planning a program. All this, combined with excellent customer service, good marketing, and hard work has led to success for Organizational Learning Resources.
Grant Walker, President and CEO, Organizational Learning Resources